Market Research

Millennials are typically defined as those born between the early 1980s through to the late 1990s. Aged between 22-37 years old, this generation accounts for about a quarter of the world's population. Most notably, millennials have grown up with the internet. They are used to having information instantly available at their fingertips and were the generation that led the way in terms of social media and using mobile devices to stay in touch 24/7. But what does this mean for the healthcare industry?

  Lupus is a long-term medical condition that causes inflammation to the joints, skin, and other organs. It's an autoimmune disease that means the body's immune system attacks healthy tissue, and there are two main types of the condition: discoid lupus and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It's not fully understood what causes it, but things such as viral infections, strong medications, sunlight, puberty, childbirth and menopause can all trigger the condition. Unfortunately, there is no cure for lupus, but if treatment starts early then the symptoms can improve.

 Patients have a completely unique view on diseases and treatment. Their perspective is often very different to the physicians that treat them due to the intimate relationship they have with the conditions they are living with, as well as their personal experience of a range of therapy options. As a result, patient market research can provide a huge amount of in-depth insight into what it's like living with these diseases, which can help healthcare professionals and pharma companies see things from a new perspective.

Thanks to apps, wearables and other connected devices, patients have never been in more control of their health. All of this new technology in the healthcare industry has huge benefits for stakeholders. So, if the industry wants to keep up with patient demands, it needs to reduce costs and improve efficiency - and next generation networks such as 5G are set to be a pivotal part of this transformation.

What is ophthalmology? Ophthalmology is a branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disorders of the eyes and visual system. Ophthalmologists are specialists in medical and surgical eye disease, and look after a wide scope of patients ranging from premature babies to the most senior members of the population.

Whatever the size or subject of your medical market research project, in order to get the most out of your market research you'll need to carefully choose the best supplier for you. Your market research supplier should be fully briefed, understand your business, your research objectives and appreciate the work you are doing and why you are doing it - and the clearer you are with them from the beginning. The higher chance you have of securing the right participants for your research. Want to find out more? Read on for our top questions to ask your market research supplier;

It's not surprising that focus groups are one of the most popular research methodologies out there - after all, they're a great way to get insightful qualitative results and can be a faster alternative to individual interviews. However, the key to running a successful medical focus group is all in the moderating. A good moderator brings out the best in the participants, peeking into their minds and asking the right questions at the right time to gather deep insights. If you're thinking about conducting a medical focus group as part for your next research project, read on for our top ten tips on successful moderation;

The facts about pharmacy Pharmacy is the third largest health profession in the UK - a good job really, considering that in England alone 1.6 million people visit a pharmacy each and every day with the average person paying the pharmacy a visit 14 times over the course of a year. To qualify, pharmacists must train for a total of five years - that's one less year than a doctor and one more year than a nurse - and once fully qualified, you'll find them in a number of different settings, from the high street to hospitals to universities, with some pharmacists now even working in GP surgeries.