GKA Blog

What is ophthalmology? Ophthalmology is a branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disorders of the eyes and visual system. Ophthalmologists are specialists in medical and surgical eye disease, and look after a wide scope of patients ranging from premature babies to the most senior members of the population.

What is prostate cancer? Prostate cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when the cells in the prostate gland grow out of control. It usually develops very slowly and it may be some years before symptoms start to appear when the prostate is large enough to affect the urethra. The causes of prostate cancer are largely unknown; however we do know that the risk of developing this type of cancer is higher in men over the age of 50 and that men with first degree relatives who have had prostate cancer also have an increased risk.

There are almost 286,000 nurses in the UK, with the majority working for the NHS. Nurses work across all demographics to fulfill the requirements of the public in a variety of settings, from hospitals and health centres to nursing homes and hospices across a range of specialties and subspecialties such as respiratory, diabetes, neurology, cardiology and more. As well as working in multidisciplinary teams across different bands, nurses are increasingly found working independently, too - and with so many nurses working across so many specialities across so many bands, it can be tricky to keep up with who does what and know who to reach out to for medical market research. But don't worry, that's what we're here for! Read on for our handy guide to NHS nurse bandings in the UK healthcare system;

The UK healthcare landscape is an extremely complicated topic. With numerous layers of various structures and an assortment of stakeholders to make sense of, it can often take a long time to understand - and that's exactly why we've put together this handy beginner's guide. From explaining the different areas that are vital to healthcare market research to outlining the type of respondents we can reach here at GKA, consider this your whistle stop tour of UK healthcare; 

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) were created following the Health and Social Care Act in 2012 and replaced Primary Care Trusts on 1st April 2013. With 207 CCGs in England, these clinically-led statutory NHS bodies are responsible for the planning and commissioning of healthcare services in their local area and are responsible for getting the best possible health outcomes for the local population by assessing needs and buying in services from different providers. Or, to put it simply, it's a group of GPs that is responsible for managing and improving the health of their local area. Since their introduction four years ago in 2013, we're taking a look at how CCGs are working and what the future holds;

Age Regulated Macular Degeneration, or AMD as it's also known, is a common eye condition and the leading form of central vision loss in the UK, currently affecting more than 600,000 people. By 2020, it's predicted that 700,000 people will have late stage AMD in the UK, making it a fast growing area in healthcare market research. AMD develops when the macula, a small spot near the centre of the retina that is required for sharp, clear vision, is damaged. In some people, AMD advances so slowly that vision loss doesn't occur for a long time, whereas in others it progresses quickly and may lead to a loss of vision in one or both eyes.

No matter how much planning you do and whatever measures you put in place, a medical market research project is only as strong as its weakest respondent. Your respondents are the fundamental foundation for any successful project, the thing that can transform your research project from a good one into a great one. But how do you ensure your sample of respondents is a good one?

Once you've carefully selected your recruits ready for your patient market research project,next up you need to verify them to make sure they really are who and what you want for your market research study. Validation is an important part of the market research process; although on paper someone might appear to be the perfect participant for your study, validation gives you a chance to dig a little deeper. Sure, first impressions count - but you need to be certain that your first impression was correct.

Whatever the size or subject of your medical market research project, in order to get the most out of your market research you'll need to carefully choose the best supplier for you. Your market research supplier should be fully briefed, understand your business, your research objectives and appreciate the work you are doing and why you are doing it - and the clearer you are with them from the beginning. The higher chance you have of securing the right participants for your research. Want to find out more? Read on for our top questions to ask your market research supplier;

From smartphones to laptops and emails to social media, whether you're in the office or at home - there's not a single aspect of our lives that doesn't involve technology. Today's technology enables researchers to gather a wealth of in-depth information, allowing them to get a true insight into respondents' lives, thought and feelings, instantly empowering researchers and enabling them to understand more than ever before. Read on to discover how you can use tech to transform your medical market research